Iphone 256.JPG
2.jpg
baptism.jpg
Iphone 256.JPG

Priesthood


SCROLL DOWN

Priesthood


What is the priesthood?

"The Priesthood is the heart of the love of Jesus"

St. John Marie Vianney

"Through the sacrament of Holy Orders priests share in the universal dimensions of the mission that Christ entrusted to the apostles. the spiritual gift they have received in ordination prepares them, not for a limited and restricted mission, "but for the fullest, in fact the universal mission of salvation 'to the end of the earth,"' "prepared in spirit to preach the Gospel everywhere." 

"It is in the Eucharistic cult or in the Eucharistic assembly of the faithful (synaxis) that they exercise in a supreme degree their sacred office; there, acting in the person of Christ and proclaiming his mystery, they unite the votive offerings of the faithful to the sacrifice of Christ their head, and in the sacrifice of the Mass they make present again and apply, until the coming of the Lord, the unique sacrifice of the New Testament, that namely of Christ offering himself once for all a spotless victim to the Father."  From this unique sacrifice their whole priestly ministry draws its strength."  (CCC 1565-1566)


The model of all parish priests - Saint John Marie Vianney

  "Show me the way to Ars, and I will show you the way to heaven"

"Show me the way to Ars, and I will show you the way to heaven"

 

A priest is a man of prayer

A man called to the priesthood must be rooted in a life of prayer.  Each day in the life of a priest is centered on prayer.  Offering the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass, praying the Divine Office, contemplation of Sacred Scripture, and a Holy Hour in front of the Blessed Sacrament are all part of the life of prayer necessary in the life of a priest. 

A priest is a man of service

Ordained in the person of Jesus Christ the head, a priest must then act in the person of Christ the head.  At the Last Supper, Jesus washed the feet of the apostles.  Jesus came to serve, not to be served.  A priest is the servant of God, ordered to serve God's people at all times, in Word and Sacrament.

A priest is a man of sacrifice

A priest is ordained to offer sacrifice, primarily at the Altar.  A man called to priesthood should be one who understands sacrifice and lives that out everyday.  Self giving, generous, and humble of heart should define a man of sacrifice.   

A priest is a man of mission

A priest is sent to preach the Gospel, in and out of season.  A priest is sent to baptize all nations, in the name of the Father, and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit.  A priest is a man called to go out to the peripheries of society and to walk with the people of God.  Each man called to priesthood should have a zeal of mission in their heart.

2.jpg

Religious Life


Religious Life


Religious Life

"Religious life was born in the East during the first centuries of Christianity. Lived within institutes canonically erected by the Church, it is distinguished from other forms of consecrated life by its liturgical character, public profession of the evangelical counsels, fraternal life led in common, and witness given to the union of Christ with the Church.

Religious life derives from the mystery of the Church. It is a gift she has received from her Lord, a gift she offers as a stable way of life to the faithful called by God to profess the counsels. Thus, the Church can both show forth Christ and acknowledge herself to be the Savior's bride. Religious life in its various forms is called to signify the very charity of God in the language of our time.

All religious, whether exempt or not, take their place among the collaborators of the diocesan bishop in his pastoral duty.  From the outset of the work of evangelization, the missionary "planting" and expansion of the Church require the presence of the religious life in all its forms.  'History witnesses to the outstanding service rendered by religious families in the propagation of the faith and in the formation of new Churches: from the ancient monastic institutions to the medieval orders, all the way to the more recent congregations'."  CCC 925-927

 

Evangelical Councils

"Christ proposes the evangelical counsels, in their great variety, to every disciple. the perfection of charity, to which all the faithful are called, entails for those who freely follow the call to consecrated life the obligation of practicing chastity in celibacy for the sake of the Kingdom, poverty and obedience. It is the profession of these counsels, within a permanent state of life recognized by the Church, that characterizes the life consecrated to God.  The religious state is thus one way of experiencing a "more intimate" consecration, rooted in Baptism and dedicated totally to God.  In the consecrated life, Christ's faithful, moved by the Holy Spirit, propose to follow Christ more nearly, to give themselves to God who is loved above all and, pursuing the perfection of charity in the service of the Kingdom, to signify and proclaim in the Church the glory of the world to come."  CCC 915-916
 
 Veronica wipes the face of Jesus

Veronica wipes the face of Jesus

Pope John Paul II in "Vita Consecrata" describes the evangelical counsels in light of the Trinity:

"The chastity of celibates and virgins, as a manifestation of dedication to God with an undivided heart (cf. 1 Cor 7:32-34), is a reflection of the infinite love which links the three Divine Persons in the mysterious depths of the life of the Trinity, the love to which the Incarnate Word bears witness even to the point of giving his life, the love ‘poured into our hearts through the Holy Spirit’ (Rom 5:5), which evokes a response of total love for God and the brethren.

Poverty proclaims that God is man's only real treasure. When poverty is lived according to the example of Christ who, ‘though he was rich ... became poor’ (2 Cor 8:9), it becomes an expression of that total gift of self which the three Divine Persons make to one another. This gift overflows into creation and is fully revealed in the Incarnation of the Word and in his redemptive death.

Obedience, practiced in imitation of Christ, whose food was to do the Father's will (cf. Jn 4:34), shows the liberating beauty of a dependence which is not servile but filial, marked by a deep sense of responsibility and animated by mutual trust, which is a reflection in history of the loving harmony between the three Divine Persons" (par 21).

P4050319.JPG

 
baptism.jpg

Marriage


Marriage


"The communion of love between God and people, a fundamental part of the Revelation and faith experience of Israel, finds a meaningful expression in the marriage covenant which is established between a man and a woman."  

-Saint John Paul II, Familiaris Consortio 12


11403067_10155757585780385_5531553321496358103_n.jpg

"How can I ever express the happiness of the marriage that is joined together by the Church strengthened by an offering, sealed by a blessing, announced by angels and ratified by the Father? ...How wonderful the bond between two believers with a single hope, a single desire, a single observance, a single service! They are both brethren and both fellow-servants; there is no separation between them in spirit or flesh; in fact they are truly two in one flesh and where the flesh is one, one is the spirit." Tertullian, Ad uxorem, II, VIII, 6-8


"The family finds in the plan of God the Creator and Redeemer not only its identity, what it is, but also its mission, what it can and should do. The role that God calls the family to perform in history derives from what the family is; its role represents the dynamic and existential development of what it is. Each family finds within itself a summons that cannot be ignored, and that specifies both its dignity and its responsibility: family, become what you are.

Accordingly, the family must go back to the 'beginning" of God's creative act, if it is to attain self-knowledge and self-realization in accordance with the inner truth not only of what it is but also of what it does in history. And since in God's plan it has been established as an "intimate community of life and love,' (Pastoral Constitution on the Church in the Modern World Gaudium et spes, 48) the family has the mission to become more and more what it is, that is to say, a community of life and love, in an effort that will find fulfillment, as will everything created and redeemed, in the Kingdom of God. Looking at it in such a way as to reach its very roots, we must say that the essence and role of the family are in the final analysis specified by love. Hence the family has the mission to guard, reveal and communicate love, and this is a living reflection of and a real sharing in God's love for humanity and the love of Christ the Lord for the Church His bride.

Every particular task of the family is an expressive and concrete actuation of that fundamental mission. We must therefore go deeper into the unique riches of the family's mission and probe its contents, which are both manifold and unified."  St. John Paul II, Familiaris Consortio 17